Bach flower shapes and energy

Could the energy of a flower essence be reflected in the shape of the plant’s flowers?

A few years ago, I heard a talk which suggested this.  I can’t remember the name of the speaker but she linked various flower essence systems together through flower shape.  It’s an interesting idea and, if true, could be useful if, for example, we find ourselves somewhere we can’t access Dr Bach’s remedies or plants and we could select from the local flora based on flower shape.

So I thought I’d have a look at this in a vaguely systematic way.  I took the Australian Bush essences and used a list of their indications to map them to the closest Bach remedy (or often remedies).  Currently there are 66 Bush essences that come from single flowers, some of which are very specific or relate to the physical or metaphysical (for example, Mulla mulla for fear of flames and heat; She oak indicated for female imbalance and Angelsword for spiritual confusion).

Star of Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum); image from pixabay.com

For those which related to emotional states, I compared photographs of the flowers from the Bush Flower Essences and Bach Centre websites and if this didn’t give a clear answer, from internet searches of the species’ botanical names.

Fringed violet (Thysanotus tuberosus); image copyright ABFE

 

 

 

It proved to be good revision of indications for me!  But what about the flower shapes?  The example which was given in the talk linked Star of Bethlehem with Fringed violet (one of the indicators for this is shock).  The photos look convincing, with each having flowers with six narrow petals but is it just a coincidence?

The table shows the results from the 20 best matches of indications, other than Star of Bethlehem/Fringed violet and my comparison of flower shapes (flower shape similarity, Fss).

Bush flower essence Bach remedy Common indication(s) Fss
Billy goat plum

Black-eyed Susan

Boronia

Dog rose•

Dog rose of the wild forces

Grey spider flower

Gymnea lily

Isopogon

Jacaranda

Kapok bush

Mountain devil

Red grevillea

Red lily

Southern cross

Sturt Desert pea

Sturt Desert rose

Sundew

Sunshine wattle

Tall yellow top

Yellow cowslip orchid

Crab apple

Impatiens

White chestnut

Mimulus

Cherry plum

Rock rose

Vine

Chestnut bud

Scleranthus

Wild rose

Holly

Walnut

Clematis

Willow

Sweet chestnut

Pine

Clematis

Honeysuckle

Water violet

Beech

Unable to accept physical self

Impatience

Obsessive thoughts

Fearful; shy

Fear of losing control

Terror

Dominating, over-riding personality

Inability to learn from past

Changeable; dithering

Apathy

Hatred; anger

Affected by criticism and other people

Daydreaming; lack of focus

Complaining; victim mentality

Deep hurt; emotional pain

Guilt

Daydreaming; vagueness

Stuck in the past

Isolation; loneliness

Critical; judgemental

None

None

None

None

Slight*

None

None

Slight**

None

Some***

None

None

None

None

None

None

None

None

None

None

*Dog rose of the wild forces has 6 petals compared to 5 for cherry plum, but otherwise, there is a slight similarity in shape.

**Isopogon is slightly bud-like.

***Kapok bush flower petals are the same shape as wild rose flower petals, but narrower.  There are the same number of petals in each.

•Dog rose Bush flower essence is from Bauera rubioides not Rosa canina (from which Bach Wild rose is made).

There are three flowers where there appear to be some similarities with the Bach flowers, the most similar being Kapok bush and Wild rose (Rosa canina) – see photos below.  Kapok bush/Wild rose is fairly convincing but I would have expected more if the link was any more than coincidental (there aren’t that many potential shapes of flowers!)

Not in any way a comprehensive or exhaustive study, but I can’t find any compelling evidence that there is a link between flower shape and the indications for the remedy (and by implication, the energy of the flower).

What do you think?  Have you found any examples, either among the Bush flower essences or any of the other remedy systems, where the flowers seem similar to the Bach flowers? Post comments on facebook.

Kapok bush (Cochlospermum fraseri); image copyright ABFE

Rosa canina

Dog rose (Rosa canina); image from pixabay.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources: www.bachcentre.com

http://ausflowers.com.au/Products/Single-Essences

Australian Bush Flower Essences info sheet; Bush Biotherapies Ltd

The Plants of Dr Bach (https://www.cambridge-bach.co.uk/plants-dr-bach/)